Hole Profile: Nos. 10 and 16 at Elk Ridge Require Extra Attention

By Ray Brewer, Contributor

Elk Ridge Golf Club

ATLANTA, MICH. - Most golf courses have one hole that is considered the big challenge. You know the hole where a double-boogie has the same sense of accomplishment as an eagle.

Well, at the Elk Ridge Golf Club in Atlanta Mich., there are two holes that stick out on the course map as extra-challenging.

Scott Landane, the course's director of golf, has some simple tips in battling holes No. 10 and 16 at the Elk Ridge.

THE HOLES: No. 10 is a par-three that includes an elevation change over 100 feet.

No. 16 is a par- four that tests the accuracy and distance of your driver. From an elevated tee box, the hole doglegs to the left around water and wetlands.

"These aren't one of our higher holes (in terms of difficulty ranking)," Landane said. "We have several par-5s that are challenging. These are probably the most exciting holes because of the decision and challenge."

Elk Ridge Golf Club ARCHITECT: Jerry Matthews

THE STRATEGY: On No. 10, Landane uses a five-iron to tee of with 190 yards separating the tee box from the stick. However, with the 100-foot elevation drop and constant prevailing winds, Landane says to go down two clubs and then tee off.

Landane warns to be cautious of the bunker guarding the right side of the green, describing how it has jumped out to surprise several golfers over the years. On the 16th, he uses a three-wood to tee off. Landane offers this crucial pointer: the longer the drive, the more dogleg that is eliminated. This leaves a shorter iron shot to an elevated green.

Elk Ridge Golf Club THE AVERAGE GOLFER: "The 10th is basically club selection because of the elevation drop,v Landane says. "Plus there is a good stiff breeze coming from the north to northwest." If you don't hit a good tee shot, then Landane warns the rest of the hole will be an uphill battle. Attacking the 16th involves the same mindset. "The 16 plays how you want it to play," Landane said. "The bigger hitter can take on the marsh land and then hit a wedge into the whole. Other than that, it is a good idea to play around it. It just depends how much you want to take off the corner."

DON'T PLAY: On both holes, don't play clubs that will get you into to early trouble. It's easier to be conservative and take calculated risks than go for broke and ruin your entire round.

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Ray Brewer, Contributor


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